Best Woodwinds Kontakt Libraries

Woodwind instruments are a family of musical instruments within the more general category of wind instruments. Common examples include flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, and saxophone. Recent years have seen a surge of winds in music, especially in Dance music and Trap, mostly grabbing from exotic influences such as the mid-eastern culture, and if you’re looking for some cool Kontakt libraries to expand your sonic palette, you should definitely check out these deals on https://audioplugin.deals/shop/

Vocal Kontakt libraries can come in handy whether you can’t record vocals or you need a specific voice to fit the track.

The cool thing about sticking to Kontakt is that the catalog of libraries available can only expand with time.

Here’s a list of the best woodwinds Kontakt libraries available on AudioPluginDeals.

 

Orchestral Woodwinds & World Flutes Bundle by Gothic Instruments

Powered by the award-winning DRONAR Engine for Kontakt, Orchestral Woodwinds can create complex, mind-expanding atmospheres triggered by just a few keys (one to four recommended).

Perfect for media composers and sound designers, Orchestral Woodwinds has been built around premium recordings of flute, piccolo, clarinet, oboe, and bassoon performances. In the DRONAR Engine, eight separate sounds are animated by independent arpeggiators and modulations to conjure an otherworldly halo of hope with a hint of mythical birds and forest green.

Combining rich organic Chinese dizi, Irish whistle, ocarina, and pan pipes textures with DRONAR’s deep, expressive and innovative atmospheric sound creation tools, it’ll take you just a few clicks to craft otherworldly yet deeply human atmospheres, pads, soundscapes, and more to whisk your listeners on a journey from fear and suspense to uplifting optimism.

 

Ventus Ethnic Winds Bundle by Impact Soundworks

The 5-in-1 Ventus Ethnic Winds Bundle is a collection of beautiful, deep-sampled solo woodwinds from around the world including an Irish tin whistle, Japanese shakuhachi, Indian bansuri, and two pan flutes, and three ocarinas. Built for the full retail version of Kontakt, all instruments use Impact Soundworks unified Ventus interface for easy playability and lots of included phrases!

The shakuhachi is an ancient end-blown flute used in Japanese music for over 1,300 years. Performing the instrument and using techniques like vibrato is significantly different than Western flutes and recorders. Its five (pentatonic) holes can produce several octaves of pitches with breathy, serene, and emotional tones.

Pan flutes (or pan pipes) are instruments that developed independently all over the world, featuring tuned pipes or tubes created from various kinds of wood or reed. For our library, we sampled the versatile Romanian nai, whose beautiful and breathy tone is instantly recognizable from countless film scores and albums. The nai offers a fairly large pitch range compared to many pan flutes, making it ideal as both a melodic and accompanying instrument for many styles.

The bansuri is an ancient flute indigenous to India, known as the nadi or tunava in some texts. It has a special role in North Indian and Hindustani classical music and is often known as the “divine instrument”, carrying with it the appropriate religious significance. Unlike many ancient flutes, the bansuri is transverse (side-blown).

The tin whistle – or feadóg (Gaelic) – is a humble yet versatile recorder-like instrument that is firmly established as a mainstay of traditional Celtic music. Though this instrument family is among the most ancient on Earth, the tin whistle itself found its popularity in the 19th century within the United Kingdom in particular.

Pendant Ocarinas date from the time of the Incas and were used as instruments for festivals, rituals, and ceremonies. They usually have 8-9 holes and are often shaped like animals (ours is a toad). The Triple Ocarina is a multi-chambered ocarina with a broad range of about two octaves plus a fifth. The Chinese Xun is an ancient eggshaped aerophone that dates back 7,000 years and was been used primarily in the performance of palace music.

 

O’Malley’s Irish Whistles by LIBREWAVE

O’Malley’s Irish Whistles is a collection of 4 virtual instruments with samples performed by Mimi O’Malley.

Features such as legato, continuous dynamics, and a dedicated breath controller mode give you the ability to craft a nuanced performance.

For such a simple instrument the Irish whistle has a huge emotional range and it’s something I’ve always wanted to sample.

O’Malley’s Irish Whistles was performed by Mimi O’Malley and recorded in the same studio as Michaela’s Harp.

Despite the inclusion of separate articulations, the library was built from a performance-first perspective. The sophisticated scripting lets you trigger the different articulations and perform in a way that feels natural on the keyboard.

 

Indian Flute by Rast Sound

The Indian Flute has a magical sound that is reminiscent of the core Indian culture. Now recorded locally and available as solo instruments, patterns, phrases, and long improvisations for Kontakt & WAV.

Rast Sound prepared this library so film composers and beat makers can make the most of it with ease, inject some world flair with speed and work with a wealth of unique inspiration.

 

Dicky Deegan’s Uilleann Pipes by Xtant Audio

This unique library is a beautifully recorded set of Uilleann Pipes performed by the talented Dicky Deegan.

Traditionally sampled in a studio setting with three mic positions to give a close, warm, and intimate sound.

The uilleann pipes are the national bagpipe of Ireland. The word uilleann comes from the Irish term píobaí uilleann which means “pipes of the elbow” and refers to the method of inflating the bag. This is done via a set of bellows that are strapped around the player’s waist and are operated by their arm.

 

Practice Set

The practice set is mainly used by beginners but also by advanced players, it consists of just the pipe bag, bellows, and chanter.

 

Half Set

The half set is the same as the practice set with the addition of three drone pipes. The drones can be turned on or off and each produces a single note, the tonic of the chanter.

 

Full Set

A full set is the same as the half set with the addition of three regulators. These are used to provide accompaniment to the chanter. They are played with keys arranged in rows that enable the playing of two or three-note chords as well as single notes.

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Greg Savage
2 months ago

Great post!

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